How Your State Taxes Your Social Security

Updated: Aug 19




Want to know if and how your state taxes your social security? Well, we have some insight on this. There are some states, that do and others that don’t. Some exempt portions of social security income, all depending on age and income level.

Here some useful insight from the Tax Foundation.


Alabama: Social Security is not taxable income


Alaska: No state income tax


Arizona: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Arkansas: Social Security is not taxable income


California: Social Security is not taxable income


Colorado: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Connecticut: For any taxpayer with either less than $75,000 (single filers) or $100,000 (filing joints) in adjusted gross income(AGI), their social security income is excluded from state taxes


Delaware: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Florida: Social Security is not taxable income


Georgia: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Hawaii: Social Security is not taxable income


Idaho: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Illinois: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Indiana: Social Security is not taxable income


Iowa: Social Security is not taxable income


Kansas: Any taxpayer who has an AGI under $75,000 have their social security excluded from state taxes


Kentucky: Social Security is not taxable income


Louisiana: Social Security is not taxable income


Maine: Social Security is not taxable income


Maryland: Social Security is not taxable income


Massachusetts: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Michigan: Social Security is not taxable income


Minnesota: Reduces social security taxation for individuals’ whose AGI is below $81,180(single filer) or $103,930( filing jointly)


Mississippi: Social Security is not taxable income


Missouri: Taxpayers who have below $85,000(single filer) or a below $100,000(filing jointly) in AGI have their social security excluded from state taxes


Montana: Social Security is not taxable income


Nebraska: Social Security is taxed on the state level as it is taxed on the federal level


Nevada: No state income tax


New Hampshire: Social Security is not taxable income


New Jersey: Social Security is not taxable income


New Mexico: Social Security is not taxable income


New York: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


North Carolina: Social Security is not taxable income


North Dakota: Taxpayers who have below $50,000(single filer) or a below $100,000(filing jointly) in AGI have their social security excluded from state taxes


Ohio: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Oklahoma: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Pennsylvania: Social Security is not taxable income


Rhode Island: Taxpayers who have below $81,900(single filer) or a below $102,400(filing jointly) in AGI have their social security excluded from state taxes


South Carolina: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Tennessee: Social Security is not taxable income


Texas: No state income tax


Utah: Social Security is taxed on the state level as it is taxed on the federal level


Vermont: Taxpayers who have below $34,000 (single filer) or a below $44,000(filing jointly) in AGI have a portion of their social security excluded from state taxes


Virginia: Exempts a portion of social security included in federal income tax


Washington: No state income tax


West Virginia: Social Security is not taxable income


Wisconsin: Social Security is not taxable income


Wyoming: No state income tax

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